6 Ways to Manage an Intense Reaction to Marijuana

Whether you are an experienced cannabis user or a complete novice, odds are you’ve experienced being too high. This can be an overwhelming experience for medical marijuana patients, but with time you can learn your limits and decrease the likelihood of these occurrences. Remember to ease into cannabis use, especially with potent methods such as edibles and concentrates. You can always take more, but you can never take less.

To help patients who have become higher than they’d like we’ve created a simple “Decreasing Your High” guide with six tried-and-true methods for lessening unwanted effects of marijuana use.


Take some CBD 

CBD (Cannibidiol) works wonders to lessening the psychoactive effects of THC. Keep a tincture on hand for those rare occasions when you’ve had too much to handle. Find them on our menu here.


Remain calm 

It is important to understand that you cannot overdose from marijuana. This experience will subside in time, and panicking will not help. Find a quiet, familiar place to lie down and relax. Focus on taking deep breaths, and keep reminding yourself that you will be okay!


Distract yourself 

Marijuana is supposed to be a therapeutic, enjoyable experience! Let’s find something for you to do and take your mind off things:

    • Listen to your favorite band’s new album. Notice how marijuana can enhance music!
    • Binge-watching movies and television will help pass the time. Before long, you’ll forget you were too high in the first place!
    • Make yourself a delicious meal. Dig in your refrigerator, find a recipe, and starting cooking. This gives you a task to concentrate on, and the end result is a tasty reward!
    • Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate! The familiar and simple action of swallowing is an easy way to take your mind off things, while also curing that pesky dry mouth. Note: Hydrate with water, not alcohol. It thins your blood and will effectively increase the THC concentration in your system, increasing drowsiness and a lack of alertness.


Get some fresh air 

Taking a walk gets your blood pumping and provides a change of scenery. Be careful not to wander too far, as you don’t want to get lost if you’re already paranoid and anxious. Even spending some time in your own backyard can help alleviate mental stress. So, get out and enjoy some Vitamin D!


Take a shower or bath 

This isn’t always possible if you’re at a friend’s house, or out in public. If you’re at home – a warm shower or bath can calm the senses.


Conceal the high 

One of the worst feelings is feeling like other people can notice you that you are too high. Using eyedrops, chewing gum, and spraying perfume/cologne mask the signs of recent cannabis use.


Bonus Tip: Black pepper

It may seem like we’re selling you snake oil, but there is legitimate science behind this claim. Chewing a few peppercorns will help relieve cannabis-induced anxiety…try it out for yourself!


We hope this article aids in fine-tuning your medical marijuana regimen, or even helps in a time of urgent need! As always, do not hesitate to contact or visit Oasis Dispensaries if you have any questions or want to discuss anything contained in this article.


History of Medical Marijuana Legalization in Arizona

As represented on this timeline, the History of Marijuana as Medicine started back in 2900 BC

The federal government in the United States continues to classify marijuana as a Schedule 1 Substance, meaning it has no accepted medical value and it has a high potential for abuse

This federal law has not stopped states from legalizing marijuana.  In 1996, California was the first state to legalize medical marijuana.  Currently, recreational marijuana is legal in 8 states and the District of Columbia, and medical marijuana is legal in 29 states and the District of Columbia

1996 – Proposition 200

  • Arizona was one of the leaders in the fight to legalize marijuana.
  • In 1996, voters approved Proposition 200 (65% – 35%).
  • Proposition 200 was a drug policy reform initiative; however, it also contained a provision allowing the use of marijuana with a doctor’s prescription.

1998 – Proposition 300

  • A technicality in terminology caused repeal of the medical marijuana portion of proposition 200 a few months after its approval by voters in 1996.
  • Proposition 200 allowed doctors to prescribe marijuana; however, a prescription was prohibited by federal law.
  • Future propositions corrected the language to avoid conflict with federal law by replacing the term prescription with recommendation.
  • The revision of Proposition 200, named Promposition300, was rejected by voters in 1998.

2002 – Proposition 203

  • Arizona voters failed to legalize medical marijuana (42.7% – 57.3%).

2010 – Proposition 203

  • With a narrow majority, Arizona approves medical marijuana (50.1% – 49.9%).

2016 – Proposition 205

  • Recreational marijuana failed to win a majority of the voter’s support (48.7% – 51.3%)
  • The proposed legislation would have legalized recreational marijuana use for adults of 21, with regulation similar to alcohol, including a 15 percent tax on retail sales.

2018 – In Progress 

  • Recreational marijuana may get on the November 2018 ballot.
  • Initial paperwork filed allows the committee until July 2018, to obtain 156,042 signatures to qualify to get on the ballot.

As of September 2016, Arizona has about 100,000 medical marijuana patients and about 100 operating state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries. The Arizona Department of Health Services (AZDHS) regulates the Arizona medical Marijuana Act (AMMA).


Who can purchase medical marijuana?

  • An Arizona medical marijuana card is needed to purchase it:
    • Recommendation required from a state-licensed doctor.
    • Patient must have at least once qualifying condition.
    • Allows for the purchase and possession of up to 2.5 ounces from a state-licensed dispensary every two weeks.
    • Special qualifications can permit patient to grow up to 12 pants or find a caregiver to grow for them.
  • Patients under 18 years old must apply with their custodial parent or legal guardian.
  • The qualifying patient may designate a caregiver.


What medical conditions qualify? 

  • Qualifying medical conditions:
    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
    • Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
    • Hepatitis C
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
    • Crohn’s Disease
    • Agitation of Alzheimer’s disease
    • A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment for a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that causes:
      • Cachexia or wasting syndrome;
      • Severe and chronic pain;
      • Severe nausea;
      • Seizures, including those characteristic of epilepsy;
      • Severe or persistent muscle spasms, including those characteristic of multiple sclerosis
      • If your medical condition is missing from the list of qualifying medical conditions, Arizona permits individuals to request additions to the list.


Who can write a medical marijuana certification in Arizona? 

  • Physicians with a valid Arizona license may who have a physician-patient relationship with the patient may write a medical marijuana certification on the specified ADHS form for a patient with a qualifying condition. These physicians include Allopathic (MD), Osteopathic (DO), Homeopathic [MD(H) or DO(H)], and Naturopathic [NMD or ND].
  • The law does not require a physician to write medical marijuana certifications for a patient with a qualifying condition.
  • If the diagnosing physician chooses not to write the certificate, a patient can consult with another physician to obtain the written certification. The new physical must certify that he has made or confirmed the patient’s qualifying medical condition, and the physician declares he has undertaken specific activities to establish a physician-patient relationship.
  • Annually, the patient needs to obtain certification from a physician that the qualifying condition still exists.

Click here to learn the steps involved in obtaining your medical marijuana card in Arizona.